The policies and culture that remote-first companies embrace are worth every company embracing. Regardless of where the employees work.

Remote work is…Hard. Here to stay. And not for everyone, or every company. Remote is intentional, not accidental — Focused first on how, not where.

And of course, remote is not what’s happening right now during COVID-19 for knowledge workers across the globe.

Remote will play a huge role for companies and employees going forward, but the polarizing headlines often don’t leave enough oxygen in the room to have a conversation. And many companies and employees seem to be making judgements about remote work based on the current pandemic-working environment.

Photo by Chris Montgomery on Unsplash

Let’s take a breath. Because the policies and culture that…


Building towards a culture of speed

At this very moment, somewhere in the world, there’s a presentation to leadership wrapping up:

“Great update, team! Now, how can we get this done faster?”

Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

After the requisite back and forth about cutting scope and adding engineers, the team files out. The team is frustrated, and the leaders are worried that the team isn’t acting with enough urgency.

Both agree that: Speed wins. Constantly, collaboratively pushing from a shared sense of purpose and passion is healthy.

How might we reframe this exchange?

Reframing in the moment

Take advantage of the moment by finding the common ground: Speed wins.


This is loosely based on a blog post I wrote for Atlassian. I’m breaking up some of those ideas into a few smaller posts here. Check out part I: Cast the vision, build the version.

Introduction to the blog series

Confession: I’m a perfectionist. I’ve learned that for me, the biggest impediment to shipping value to users is the temptation to pursue the perfect product. (Any other PMs struggle with that? Just me?)

I thought I’d share some thoughts across a few posts around focus, knowing when to ship, and ultimately, how to fight the perfect product. Part one focused on casting the version, but…


This is loosely based on a blog post I wrote for Atlassian. I’m breaking up some of those ideas into a few smaller posts here.

Introduction to the blog series

Confession: I’m a perfectionist. I’ve learned that for me, the biggest impediment to shipping value to users is the temptation to pursue the perfect product. (Any other PMs struggle with that? Just me?)

I thought I’d share some of those thoughts around focus, knowing when to ship, and ultimately, how to fight the perfect product. Onwards to part one!

Part I: Focus

Cast the vision, build the version

As product managers, we have a lot of jobs, but one of them is to constantly…


Go chat with your users

Note: This is a slightly edited re-post of an article I wrote for Atlassian.

Here is my new favorite interview question for product managers: “How would you spend your first week on the job here?

Before we go on…Think for a moment. How would you answer that in an interview?

Here are some of the answers I’ve gotten:

“Hunker down and study the platform and architecture.”

“Probably call a few meetings with the team and figure out who my stakeholders are.”

“Build relationships with the developers and designers. Take them to lunch. Buy them a few beers.”

“Dig through the…


Some tidbits I’ve picked up over the years

Note: This is a slightly edited re-post of an article I wrote for Atlassian.

1. Know and grow your lens.

Product management is all about how you frame up problems and bring solutions into focus. Unlike some roles, a product manager’s success is not primarily based around growing a particular skill set, but instead by maturing their lens.

If your background is primarily technical, it may be easier for you to focus on the solution first, perhaps getting too bogged down in the technical details or the implementation. …


What I learned by starting a company

In late 2013, I started a SaaS company with two other cofounders focused on selling desktop and mobile software to general contractors and remodelers.

The three of us had worked together before and were all hungry to start something on our own. So we began looking for problems to solve and settled on the home remodeling industry.

As it turns out, most contractors’ problems are related to scheduling. Delays eat into their profits. And any work that has to be re-done usually comes out of their own pocket. …

Evan Michner

Product | Tech | ATX

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